1. Will Blackhorn 209 work in my muzzleloading rifle?

Blackhorn 209 was specifically designed for modern in-line muzzleloaders with sealed ignition systems using standard 209 shotshell primers. Follow link for the latest information on compatible rifles.

2. Will Blackhorn work with a #11 percussion or musket cap primer?

NO. #11 percussion caps, or musket caps do not have sufficient strength to ignite Blackhorn 209.

3. I have a Thompson Center Omega that I have used for several years with Triple 7. I switched to Blackhorn 209, but am having hang-fires. What is the problem?

The most common cause of hang-fires is a fouled breech plug. Breech plugs accumulate primer residue on the walls of the flash channel that continually reduces the size of the hole (this is not to be confused with the flash hole, which is the small hole at the end of the flash channel). As residue accumulates in the flash channel, the hole becomes smaller and does not allow sufficient flame to reach the powder. The residue buildup is very difficult to see with the naked eye, but this accumulation of residue will hinder ignition by effectively reducing the strength of the primer, which also affects consistency and accuracy. Regular cleaning of the flash channel is necessary to keep the channel clean and free of residue. For cleaning procedures see our breech plug cleaning page.

4. What is the best primer for Blackhorn 209?

We have experienced the best performance, consistency and accuracy with CCI 209M and Federal 209A. NOTE: DO NOT use 209 muzzleloading primers such as Winchester Triple 7, Remington Kleenbore, Federal Fusion, or CCI In-Line MZL.

5. Can I weigh my charges?

Yes. If you prefer to weigh charges, you can convert the volume load recommendations into weighed grains by multiplying the volume load by 0.7. Example: 100 units by volume x 0.7 = 70 grains by weight. 110 volume charge x 0.7 = 77 grains by weight.

6. Granules of Blackhorn stick to the walls of my plastic speed loaders or powder measure. How can I stop this from happening?

Static can be present in plastics that cause the Blackhorn 209 granules to stick. This can be eliminated by coating the inside of the plastic loader with dry graphite or wiping the inside down with an anti-static dryer sheet commonly used when drying laundry.

7. My gun is rated for 150 grains. Can I shoot 150 grains of Blackhorn 209?

Typically, guns are rated for 150 grains of black powder or Pyrodex. Blackhorn 209 is more energetic and will achieve or exceed the velocities of Pyrodex with less powder. See our load data page for maximum volumetric charges.

8. Can I use my standard powder measurer I use for reloading to dispense Blackhorn 209 into my speed loaders (i.e. Redding)?

Yes you can use a powder measure for Blackhorn 209. This is unique to Blackhorn 209 and DO NOT use a powder measure with Black Powder or any other Black Powder substitutes.

9. How long can I leave a charge in my gun?

We always recommend that you start with a fresh powder charge every day. Although Blackhorn 209 is far less hygroscopic than any other black powder substitutes, barrel “sweating” can put moisture directly in contact with the powder and may affect powder performance. Why take the chance of missing the next mornings great shot?

10. Your charge recommendations are in Volumetric Units. What are these and is it the same as weight in grains?

Volumetric Units are NOT the same as weight in grains. Blackhorn is used by volume and therefore the charge is a measurement by volume. A volume charge is measured with a standard black powder measure. It is not weighed and a setting of 100 does not mean that you have 100 grains by weight, not even black powder. The loading densities of all substitutes and grades of black powder are different. The same volume of any will yield different weights of powder.

11. Is Blackhorn 209 offered in pellet form?

No. There are currently no plans to offer Blackhorn 209 in pellet form. Charge tubes specifically designed for Blackhorn are available that can be pre-loaded by the user and are more convenient than using pellets. Using charge tubes allows you to fine tune your load to what performs best with your rifle, bullet/sabot combination.

12. How do I clean my barrel?

Use ONLY oil-based solvents. DO NOT use black powder cleaners that are water-based. We recommend Blackhorn 209 Solvent by Montana X-Treme.

13. What kind of lube do you use on the breech plug threads?

It is not necessary to use anti-seize grease on your breech plug threads when using Blackhorn 209. The breech plug is easily removed even after repeated firings of Blackhorn 209.

14. Can I use Blackhorn 209 in a cap & ball revolver?

NO. #11 percussion caps, or musket caps do not have sufficient strength to ignite Blackhorn 209.

15. Can I use Blackhorn 209 in my muzzle loading shotgun?

This is not recommended.

16. Will Blackhorn 209 work in black powder cartridges, such as the 45 colt and 45-70?

Blackhorn 209 is an excellent black powder cartridge propellant. See our load data page for specific loads.

17. Do I need to clean my brass when using Blackhorn 209?

In most cases, Blackhorn 209 will leave little residue on brass cartridges. This is not always the case so we recommend cleaning cases as soon as possible.

18. Can I use Conical bullets with Blackhorn 209?

In many cases conical bullets may work fine. However, results vary depending on the many factors so we cannot recommend conical bullets. However, many shooters have reported good results with Hornady FPB and Thor bullets.

19. I have your original guide that does not recommend bullets above 350 grains. Does this still apply?

Our original testing did not proceed beyond 350 grain bullets and as such, was not included in our first published load guide. See our current load data page for specific loads.

20. Do you have any loads for 45 caliber muzzleloaders?

Not at this time.